WELCOME

Welcome to AVA's online website. 

The mission of AVA is to empower those victimized by abuse and/or violence through advocacy and crisis intervention and to raise awareness in the community about the cause, impact, and prevention of relationship abuse, sexual violence, bullying, and child abuse and neglect. 
The Family Advocacy Program supports and promotes volunteer advocacy to protect the best interests of children in the Child Welfare System in Humboldt and Lander Counties in Nevada.

Don't be a victim, become a survivor!


In a first-ever collaboration of its kind in Nevada, AVA and the Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS) have entered into a collaborative agreement to establish the Family Advocacy Program for Humboldt and Lander Counties!


The Family Advocacy Program is to enable AVA to provide volunteers as requested by DCFS to assist in providing an array of services to support youths and families who are involved in the Child Welfare System.
Want to help make a difference in a child’s life? Help victims become survivors? Be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves? We need you!
The Family Advocacy Program is to enable AVA to provide volunteers as requested by DCFS to assist in providing an array of services to support youths and families who are involved in the Child Welfare System.
Want to help make a difference in a child’s life? Help victims become survivors? Be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves? We need you!
The Family Advocacy Program is to enable AVA to provide volunteers as requested by DCFS to assist in providing an array of services to support youths and families who are involved in the Child Welfare System.


Did you know there are FREE parenting classes in Nevada?  You can take them online, anytime. Earn required hours and learn! Many, many topics to choose from and more are always being added.  Visit: www.qpinevada.org  


Want to help make a difference in a child’s life? Help victims become survivors? Be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves? We need you!


Seeking male and female volunteers in all areas: from crisis intervention, advocacy, board members (4 hours a year minimum commitment), outreach awareness, writing, etc. For some, you don't even need to be local- only a desire to help and Care!  Training is done locally and much of it is done when you can fit it into your schedule.  Hours are flexible!


To be eligible, volunteers must be:

• Age 21 or over (depending on type of volunteering sought. Please see below for examples. Other AVA programs accepts volunteers 13 or older).
• Submit to state and federal background checks, Central Registry Screening for Child Abuse, and fingerprinting.
• Must not have been convicted of a DUI in the past 5 years or fined for used of a cellular or mobile device while driving within the past 3 years.
• Must adhere to strict confidentiality rules and laws and follow all mandatory reporting requirements for Nevada.
• 3 references (must not be related to you).
• Must be able to effectively communicate via written and oral communication, be familiar with email and basic computer skills.
• 25 hours of pre-service training is required, some of which can be done via independent study. 12 hours training annually is required. Some recent training in the required areas may be used for pre-service training hours. Proof of training must be provided.
• Volunteer schedule is extremely flexible- YOU tell US when you can volunteer and what type of volunteering you feel comfortable with! A minimum of 3 hours a month is requested.

If someone would like to volunteer but does not meet all these requirements, it does not automatically exclude you from volunteering! There is an array of volunteering that may be done with AVA. In order to work with clients as a Family and Youth Advocate, all the above standards must be met, with the exception of our Teen Crisis Program, where age requirements are 13 and older.
Other ways to volunteer is to assist with outreach awareness, grant writing, social media and other forms of public relations, crisis intervention, bullying and bystander intervention, teen advocacy, fundraising, administrative assistance. Volunteers fluent in Spanish are very much needed!


Applications can be found on our website at
www.Humboldtava.com or we can email one to you (our email is Humboldtava@sbcglobal.net).

Help make a difference in a life!
Remember: there's no such thing as "too little help"! Even an hour a month can help make a world of difference!











 For current news and how to get involved, please click on the "News" and other links on the right.

Advocates for Victims of Abuse (AVA) for the prevention, education, and advocacy against relationship abuse, sexual violence, bullying, and child abuse and neglect in Humboldt County, Winnemucca, NV.

We collaborate with community agencies and organizations to raise awareness and education about relationship abuse and sexual violence, prevention, and what to do in case of a sexual assault. We also provide referrals and resources to local and statewide agencies and programs that can assist the survivors of relationship abuse and sexual violence and their loved ones affected by the trauma.

We provide on-call advocacy for relationship abuse and sexual assault support services, with trained advocates in crisis intervention and support services.

The mission of AVA is to empower those victimized by abuse and/or violence through advocacy and crisis intervention and to raise awareness in the community about the cause, impact, and prevention of relationship abuse, sexual violence, child abuse and neglect, and bullying.
The Family Advocacy Program supports and promotes volunteer advocacy to protect the best interests of children in the Child Welfare System in Humboldt and Lander Counties in Nevada.

Don't be a victim, become a survivor!


Contact Information:
Mailing Address: 
Humboldt AVA
26 Twyila Court
Winnemucca, NV 89445
Phone: 775-623-2328, 775-304-3377 or 775-722-4564
E-Mail: humboldtava@sbcglobal.net
Website: http://www.humboldtava.com/

Nevada Sex Offender Registry Search
http://www.nvsexoffenders.gov/Search.aspx





 




Free Parenting Classes for Winnemucca, Rural Nevada, and all of Nevada via QPI Nevada!




Did you know November is National Adoption and Caregiver Month? 



As part of raising awareness we want to let you all know about an amazing site that offers a tremendous amount of information and free online classes for all caregivers-and those who work in the field too. 


Thanks to the state of Nevada, this site is AWESOME! We encourage everyone to take a look at it. Absolutely FREE! You can watch the videos and earn certificates in each section, watch from computer, phone, kindle, etc. anytime.


Click on the link, go to "rural training" (unless you're in the Clark or Washoe areas) and a very long list of all the topics and videos will show up. Some are short, some longer, all worthwhile!
EXCELLENT for caregivers, parents, foster families, and those of us who work in the field. So many excellent topics and sections to choose from and they meet state requirements for parents and caregivers who may need the courses. :-D


Check it out now!http://www.qpinevada.org

Say Something




Say Something Week began on October 24, but it’s an awareness event we should all keep in mind every day of the year.  Did you know that when it comes to threats of violence or suicide, most are known by at least one other person BEFORE the incident takes place? Say Something teaches students, grades 6-12, how to look for warning signs, signals and threats - especially in social media - from a peer who might be planning to hurt themselves or someone else and to say something to a trusted adult to get help and save a life.
Advocates for Victims of Abuse have teamed up with Say Something to provide free bracelets to raise awareness and educate others about the importance of speaking up.  If you, or your business, would like bracelets, please contact us.  Say Something reinforces the power young people have to prevent tragedies and save lives when they Say Something.
These issues are not limited to youths.  Many adults find themselves feeling hopeless, depressed, struggling to cope with a myriad of issues.  Speak up when you or someone you know is talking about suicide, suicidal ideation, violence, or going through a difficult time.   SAMHSA estimates more than 90% of those who die by suicide have a diagnosable mental health disorder.  People who die by suicide are frequently experiencing undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated depression.  Help is available and you are not alone.
 Don't let your silence be a source of regret for the rest of your life.  Please talk to someone if you or someone you know feels helpless or hopeless.  It's not always easy to talk to a friend or family member when we're struggling. It doesn't mean there is not help out there and people who do want to help.  Please do not make a decision with a permanent result based on a temporary issue.  Talk to someone. Get help and remember, you are not alone.


Please keep this list of hotline numbers and share with your loved ones:
Hotline Numbers
Adolescent Suicide Hotline
800-621-4000
Adolescent Crisis Intervention & Counseling Nineline 
1-800-999-9999
Child Abuse Hotline
800-4-A-CHILD
Domestic Violence Hotline
800-799-7233
Domestic Violence Hotline/Child Abuse 
1-800-4-A-CHILD (800 422 4453)
Drug & Alcohol Treatment Hotline
800-662-HELP
Eating Disorders Center 
1-888-236-1188
Family Violence Prevention Center 
1-800-313-1310
Gay & Lesbian National Hotline 
1-888-THE-GLNH (1-888-843-4564)
Gay & Lesbian Trevor HelpLine Suicide Prevention
1-800-850-8078
Healing Woman Foundation (Abuse) 
1-800-477-4111
Help Finding a Therapist 
1-800-THERAPIST (1-800-843-7274)
Incest Awareness Foundation 
1-888 -547-3222
Learning Disabilities - (National Center For) 
1-888-575-7373
Missing & Exploited Children Hotline 
1-800-843-5678
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) 
1-800-950-NAMI (6264)
Panic Disorder Information Hotline
800- 64-PANIC
Post Abortion Trauma 
1-800-593-2273
Project Inform HIV/AIDS Treatment Hotline
800-822-7422
Rape (People Against Rape) 
1-800-877-7252
Rape, Abuse, Incest, National Network (RAINN) 
1-800-656-HOPE (1-800-656-4673)
Runaway Hotline
800-621-4000
Self-Injury (Information only) 
(NOT a crisis line. Info and referrals only) 
1-800-DONT CUT (1-800-366-8288)
Sexual Assault Hotline 
1-800-656-4673
Sexual Abuse - Stop It Now! 
1-888-PREVENT
STD Hotline 
1-800-227-8922
Suicide Prevention Lifeline 
1-800-273-TALK
Suicide & Crisis Hotline 
1-800-999-9999
Suicide Prevention - The Trevor HelpLine
(Specializing in gay and lesbian youth suicide prevention). 
1-800-850-8078
IMAlive-online crisis chat
Teen Helpline 
1-800-400-0900
Victim Center 
1-800-FYI-CALL (1-800-394-2255)
National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Phone: 800-273-8255
Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline
Phone Number: 800-4-A-CHILD (800-422-4453)
Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
Phone Number: 800-826-3632
Boys Town National Hotline – Crisis hotline that helps parents and children cope with stress and anxiety
Phone Number: 800-448-3000
Hopeline
Phone Number: 800-442-HOPE (4673)
Mental Health America – For a referral to specific mental health service or support program in your community
Phone Number: 800-969-NMHA (6642)
National Alliance on Mental Illness – Provides support, information, and referrals
Phone Number: 800-950-NAMI (6264)
National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders
Phone Number: 847-831-3438
National Center for Victims of Crime – Multi-language service available
Phone Number: 800-FYI-CALL (394-2255)
National Domestic Violence Hotline
Phone Number: 800-799-SAFE (7233)
National Eating Disorders Association Information and Referral Helpline – Support services, help, and guidance to people struggling with eating disorders, their loved ones, and families
Phone Number: 800-931-2237
National Runaway Switchboard
Phone Number: 800-RUNAWAY (800-786-2929)
National Sexual Assault Hotline
Phone Number: 800-656-HOPE (4673)
National Suicide Prevention Hotline
Phone Number: 800-273-TALK (8255)
Postpartum Support International
Phone Number: 800-994-4PPD (4773)
PPD Moms
Phone Number: 800-PPD-MOMS (800-773-6667)
S.A.F.E. Alternatives
Phone Number: 800-DONTCUT (800-366-8288)
For more information on Say Something Week, please visit: www.sandyhookpromise.org/saysomethingweek


This column is not a substitute for medical advice.

Domestic Violence, Bullying, and Suicide: Not As Rare As You Might Think


Domestic Violence, Bullying, and Suicide: Not As Rare As You Might Think



More and more, we see the connection between domestic violence and other crimes. Unfortunately, domestic violence has spillover effect for mental health problems too. As National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month concludes and October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Bullying Prevention Month begins; consider how the two tragedies intertwine.
Still a taboo topic of discussion, suicidal thoughts and suicide occur too frequently without any resource for those suffering to get help. In many cases the loved ones affected by suicide are left in the dark, feeling shame or stigma that prevents talking openly about issues dealing with suicide. Shame and stigma are also some of the same reasons domestic violence victims suffer in silence. Suicidal thoughts can affect anyone regardless of age, gender or background just as domestic violence can affect anyone from any background. Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death among young people and is often the result of mental health conditions that effect people when they are most vulnerable.
With the prevalence of depression and other mental health illnesses in domestic violence and bullying victims, it comes as no surprise studies show that a large percentage of all suicide victims have been domestic violence victims as well. It is unclear if the connection between domestic violence and suicide is because traumatic stress is considered to be a major cause to depression and suicidal ideation or if because people with depression and mental illness are more vulnerable to being in abusive relationships. Whatever the cause, there is help.
In recent years, a series of bullying-related suicides in the US and across the globe have drawn attention to the connection between bullying and suicide. Though too many adults still see bullying as “just part of being a kid,” it is a serious problem that leads to many negative effects for victims, including suicide.
The statistics on bullying and suicide are alarming:
  • Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people, resulting in about 4,400 deaths per year, according to the CDC. For every suicide among young people, there are at least 100 suicide attempts. Over 14% of high school students have considered suicide, and almost 7% have attempted it.
  • Bully victims are between 2 to 9 times more likely to consider suicide than non-victims, according to studies by Yale University
  • 10-14 year old girls may be at even higher risk for suicide, according to the study above
  • According to statistics reported by ABC News, nearly 30% of students are either bullies or victims of bullying, and 160,000 kids stay home from school every day because of fear of bullying
Bully-related suicide can be connected to any type of bullying, including physical bullying, emotional bullying, cyberbullying, and sexting, or circulating suggestive or nude photos or messages about a person.
Some schools or regions have more serious problems with bullying and suicide related to bullying. This may be due to an excessive problem with bullying at the school. It could also be related to the tendency of students who are exposed to suicide to consider suicide themselves.
Some of the warning signs of suicide can include:
  • Showing signs of depression, like ongoing sadness, withdrawal from others, losing interest in favorite activities, or trouble sleeping or eating
  • Talking about or showing an interest in death or dying
  • Engaging in dangerous or harmful activities, including reckless behavior, substance abuse, or self injury
  • Giving away favorite possessions and saying goodbye to people
  • Saying or expressing that they can’t handle things anymore
  • Making comments that things would be better without them
If a person is displaying these symptoms, talk to them about your concerns and get them help right away, such as from a counselor, doctor, or at the emergency room.
In some cases, it may not be obvious that a teen is thinking about suicide, such as when the suicide seems to be triggered by a particularly bad episode of bullying. In several cases where bullying victims killed themselves, bullies had told the teen that he or she should kill him or herself or that the world would be better without them. Others who hear these types of statements should be quick to stop them and explain to the victim that the bully is wrong.
Other ways to help people who may be considering suicide include:
  • Take all talk or threats of suicide seriously. Don’t tell the person they are wrong or that they have a lot to live for. Instead, get them immediate medical help.
  • Keep weapons and medications away from anyone who is at risk for suicide. Get these items out of the house or at least securely locked up.
  • Encourage youths to talk about bullying. It may be embarrassing for kids to admit they are the victims of bullying, and most kids don’t want to admit they have been involved in bullying. Tell victims that it’s not their fault that they are being bullied and show them love and support.
  • Insist on being included in their children’s friends on social networking sites so they can see if someone has posted mean messages about them online.
  • Parents who see a serious bullying problem should talk to school authorities about it, and perhaps arrange a meeting with the bully’s parents. Nevada has laws against bullying, and recent lawsuits against schools and criminal charges against bullies show that there are legal avenues to take to deal with bullies. If school authorities don’t help with an ongoing bullying problem, local police or attorneys may be able to.
Anyone thinking about suicide should talk to someone right away. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1‐800‐273‐8255 and if you or someone you know is being abused, please contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1‐800‐799‐7233. For text assistance with either issue, text “GO” to 741741. If you or someone you know needs help with bullying in Nevada call 1-775-689-0150 Or text STANDUP to 839863. For more resources, you may visit our site at www.humboldtava.com or contact us at 775-722-4564 or 775-304-8964. Assistance is free and confidential at all these resources.
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Article information from Rebecca Baven and Kayce Simmons Munyeneh and used with permission.